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An Able and Faithful Ministry: Samuel Miller and the Pastoral Office James M Garretson

An Able and Faithful Ministry: Samuel Miller and the Pastoral Office

James M Garretson

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451 pages
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 About the Book 

Samuel Miller (1769–1850) played an integral part in founding Princeton Theological Seminary, which became one of the most influential training grounds for Presbyterian ministers in the nineteenth century. While Miller is most commonly remembered forMoreSamuel Miller (1769–1850) played an integral part in founding Princeton Theological Seminary, which became one of the most influential training grounds for Presbyterian ministers in the nineteenth century. While Miller is most commonly remembered for his writings on church office, he also played a significant role instructing students and shaping their theology of preaching and pastoral ministry. In the present volume, Jim Garretson highlights the narrative of Miller’s life and the major ministerial emphases found in his published writings, sermons, and unpublished lecture notes. As a result, readers will come to know the spiritual convictions of Miller’s heart and understand the theology of ministry he imparted over the course of his lifetime.Author James M. Garretson serves as ministry director for the Christian union at Harvard Law School.Endorsements “James Garretson has already provided erudite and welcome additions to the history of American pastoral theology with his work on Archibald Alexander. Now he has moved on to look at the life and teaching of another Old Princeton giant, Samuel Miller. Once again, his contribution to antebellum American religious history is remarkable. By contextualizing Miller’s pastoral teaching within his larger life and historical setting, Garretson reveals much to us about why Miller was so hugely influential among Presbyterians (and others) during his lifetime. Miller himself would appreciate Garretson’s emphasis on the practical uses of religious biography and history for contemporary readers. It is a profoundly welcome work on an Old Princeton figure who has received far less attention today than he deserves.”— Paul Gutjahr, professor and chair, Department of English, Indiana University“There is much debate today about exactly what the pastoral ministry should look like, what its priorities should be, what the tools of its trade are, and what kind of man should hold it. Once again, Jim Garretson has enriched the literature on this topic by opening up the world of the Old Princetonians for us. This book is not only a moving portrait of one of the great nineteenth-century Presbyterian pastors and thinkers but also a stimulus to practical reflection on how the traditional ordinary-means-of-grace model of church and pastor can be applied today. A wonderful volume.”— Carl Trueman, Paul Woolley Professor of Church History, Westminster Theological Seminary“James M. Garretson’s book on Samuel Miller and his teaching on the pastoral office brings one of the founding fathers of American Presbyterianism back to life. Herein, Miller enriches us with his piety, guides us with his wisdom, and equips us to be more able and faithful preachers of God’s Holy Word. This study will clarify your call to gospel service or serve as a refresher course on the godly practice of Reformed ministry.” — Peter A. Lillback, president, Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia“James Garretson’s An Able and Faithful Ministry: Samuel Miller and the Pastoral Office enhances the growing study of Old Princeton by bringing to our attention Samuel Miller’s contributions to theological education. His courses ‘Composition and Delivery of Sermons’ and ‘Pastoral Care’ show how Miller and his colleagues construed pastoral ministry as a spiritual calling. With ample illustrations, Miller unfolds the ministry’s ‘Grand Design’ as ‘preaching the Gospel.’ His detailed lectures on sermon content and delivery focused on careful explication of the text and applying the truth of the Bible to daily life. Garretson thereby demonstrates Princeton’s view of Christian ministry before it was professionalized in the twentieth century.— W.