Home » The Melvin Memorial, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Massachusetts by Alfred S. Roe
The Melvin Memorial, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Massachusetts Alfred S. Roe

The Melvin Memorial, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Massachusetts

Alfred S. Roe

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114 pages
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 About the Book 

This illustrated volume was published in 1910 and is a brothers tribute- exercises at dedication, June 16, 1909.From the books Preface:Occasionally a dream is realized. That a lad in histeens, his soul filled with love for his brothers, sorrowMoreThis illustrated volume was published in 1910 and is a brothers tribute- exercises at dedication, June 16, 1909.From the books Preface:Occasionally a dream is realized. That a lad in histeens, his soul filled with love for his brothers, sorrow fortheir untimely deaths, and admiration for their daringand devotion, should in visions see a fitting monumentto their memory is not so strange, but that he, in his latermanhood, should be able to see his dream take tangibleform is almost marvelous. Then, too, comes anotherhappy feature in that he is able to summon to the dedi-cation of his tribute the old companions of the earlyfallen, those who knew his brothers when all werereplete with life and energy, and they alone, with un-studied word, devote the memorial to its solemn mission.They are neither great scholars nor writers of note, buttheir expressions of memory and love come bright fromtheir recollections of more than forty years.It has been said that no equal area in the world con-tains so many graves of famous people of letters as doesthat burial-ground, known as the Sleepy Hollow ofConcord. It is a fact that were all the dwellers theresimultaneously to respond to the resurrection call,Thoreau would be within easy conversing distance fromHawthorne and Emerson, and all could readily talkwith the Alcotts, the father and his still more noteddaughters, while a minutes walk would carry the entiregroup to the enclosure where now reposes the mortalityof Samuel Hoar and his far wider-known sons, E. Rock-wood and George Frisbie. Well worn are the pathsleading to the last resting-places of these men andwomen of world-wide repute, and worthy, indeed, mustbe the memorial which will in any degree divide withthem the interest of visitors. It would seem that anaddition had been made to the shrines of the Cemetery,and the pilgrims who resort thither already ask for theMourning Victory who maintains sleepless vigilsover her sacred trust. When the brother sought a sculp-tor who could embody in marble the thought which hadcrowded his brain for many a weary year, fortunate washe in finding him in the person of his old associate andfriend, Daniel Chester French, himself a Concord boyand man, whose Minute Man of 1775 had, in one briefday, written the name of the artist high on the scroll offame. Entering into the mind and heart of the lovingkinsman, he gives to the clay and marble an embodi-ment which even the untaught at once recognize as alife-like realization of mans love for man and reverencefor his manly virtues. Though the dead do not appearin solid form, yet every beholder is conscious that Vic-tory ever sees the Embattled Farmer, whether hestands by the rude bridge which arched the flood,or on hospital cot, in the battle-front or in starving stock-ade, almost a century later, he gives his life for country.While a generation intervenes between the figure by theriverside and that which holds its solemn trust in SleepyHollow, and though the touch of the great artist is seenin many a labor elsewhere, even he must grant that allother work, however beautiful, lacks the soul whichhome and heart have imparted to his earliest and hislatest.