Home » Glory, Glory, Glorieta: The Gettysburg of the West by Robert Scott
Glory, Glory, Glorieta: The Gettysburg of the West Robert      Scott

Glory, Glory, Glorieta: The Gettysburg of the West

Robert Scott

Published October 1st 1992
ISBN : 9781555660987
Hardcover
246 pages
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 About the Book 

The battle of Glorieta Pass took place in 1862 a few miles east of Santa Fe, New Mexico. It involved about 7500 Union and Confederate soldiers, and the campaign ended in a victory for the north. This obscure battle in the mountains of New Mexico wasMoreThe battle of Glorieta Pass took place in 1862 a few miles east of Santa Fe, New Mexico. It involved about 7500 Union and Confederate soldiers, and the campaign ended in a victory for the north. This obscure battle in the mountains of New Mexico was either the climax of an insignificant sideshow campaign, or it was, because of its implications, one of the most decisive battles of the Civil War. The author believes it was the latter. Like Gettysburg, which put an end to Robert E. Lees invasion of the North, Glorieta Pass also stopped a significant invasion - the Confederate attempt to capture the Colorado Gold fields and ultimately the deep-water ports of the California coast. The campaign in New Mexico is the story of hardship, endurance, and courage shown by soldiers and leaders of both sides, unsurpassed in any other Civil War campaign. A participant later wrote that his unit, the First Colorado Volunteers, would have been forgotten by history had they not marched nearly a thousand miles and in one hard-fought battle and two brisk skirmishes driven from New Mexico all those lean and hungry Texans. Colonel Chivington, later of Sand Creek notoriety, the famous scout, Kit Carson, and the Texas Rangers with their anachronistic company of lancers are some of the colorful participants. The author narrates the campaign up to and following the battle as well as the fights at Peralta and Valverde and examines Glorieta in detail, including Chivingtons famous end run that resulted in the destruction of the Confederate baggage train and ultimately in total victory for the Union. Success could have put millions of dollars into the Confederate coffers and thwarted the Union naval blockade, with incalculable effects on the outcome of the Civil War. But the Confederate defeat was felt to be ignominous, and, perhaps partially as a result of a deliberate cover-up, the campaign was virtually ignored for decades after the war. The author covers the political, economic, and m